CHARGING...

2010 / 3 February

Digg Hacked or Clever Advertisement?


It appeared today as if Digg had been hacked. If you visit Digg.com and view the page source, you will see the following in the code.

However, if you notice the url near the bottom, http://hellisnigh.com points to a page which is advertising Dante’s Inferno, an EA game to be released shortly.

Which makes you wonder if this might not be a hack after all, but rather a pretty clever marketing campaign made to look like a hack.

Update:

We just got an update from Digg and it is an advertising campaign and quite a clever one if I must say so myself.

“Since Digg’s early days, ASCII art has been ingrained in our site’s culture,” said Chas Edwards, Digg Publisher and Chief Revenue Officer. “We’re thrilled with the opportunity presented by our partnership with Electronic Arts and the Dante’s Inferno team — incorporating ASCII art into advertising on Digg, while providing the 40 million users in the Digg Community first access to the promotion code.”

  • I think it may be an ad.But not a hack.Anyway can you please provide the page where you get this error on digg??

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  • Do you check th Digg source code every day? 😉

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  • Do you check the Digg source code every day? 😉

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  • Umm just go to D I G G . C O M and view source

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  • Go to Digg.com and hit Ctrl+U or go to View > Source

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  • It’s not a page. Go to view and click on Page Source when you’re on the Digg homepage. It will bring up the source code for the website and right in the beginning is the ad.

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  • Its not a page, its the source code for the website. In your browser go to View then click on "Source Code" while you're on the Digg homepage. It will open a new window with the code in it.

    Also, does anyone know if this is the first password for the site? Or are there others somewhere?

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  • If you don’t know how to see it, you obviously can’t read anyway. Very clever idea, I much prefer this to image or flash advertising. Saves bandwidth.

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  • Just view the source on the front page of digg.com
    It is still up.

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  • Thank’s for checking the Digg source code and updating us. I don’t know what I would have done without seeing another ad for Dante’s Inferno.

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  • Great idea and nicely done, even if most users won’t notice it (who watches the page source for real?).
    @Kishore Mylavarapu – this isn’t an error, just display the page source on the homepage of digg.com to see the ASCII art

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  • Not a hack, an advertising thing. All of the passwords have been found, and are available in multiple spots on the web.

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  • i think you just did some free advertising for digg.
    unless…you were paid

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  • the promotion is across several gaming and other (wwe.com?) websites.

    it leads to a site called hellisnigh.com (which, thanks to the digg effect, is now almost completely down)

    on hellisnigh.com, you have to enter 6 passwords, gathered from other sites. the passwords are:

    Password1: excommunicate (from digg.com)
    Password2: scythe (dailymotion.com/us)
    Password3: grafter (from gamespot.com)
    Password4: styx (from ign.com)
    Password5: unbaptized (from gamesradar.com)
    Password6: alighieri (from wwe.com)

    note that other gaming sites (kotaku, 1up, ugo) also had the various passwords.

    not sure what it leads to yet, but we shall see

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  • this is the worse viral tentative ever.
    Please, regroup your creative team, stop being lazy try again and remember… consumers are NOT stupid.

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  • I say this is really clever!!!

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  • Haha! Great One!

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  • @Bull….uhhh…lazy? Really? Its fairly creative, and to run around changing source codes on all the different websites to provide you with 6 different passwords to a website sure isn’t something we’ve seen before. Quite a clever idea really. I mean, obscure sure, who does check the source code on a regular basis? Butstill, kudos for imagination :)

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  • Fairly creative? Wow, you MUST be one of the team members!! hahahah

    Ok, lesson number one, if you HAVE to go around telling people where to find your “great creative idea” then you clearly can say this amazing viral idea is not so effective is it?
    Clever, sure… done before? YES. The target (people here saying they like it) is the right one. Execution? Cheap, lazy and ineffective. But I guess for a lousy game (which is what makes me feel after seen this piece) its not bad…

    If it was my team, I would tell them to go work harder and evolve this.

    Finally, creative doodes, take the criticism and grow or be a bunch of babies and defend this crap for ever.

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  • I think that is pretty interesting… The concept is simple and granted the majority of users will never see it but who cares… The users that dont know how to view the source, well who cares… Sparked a cool little discussion… Very creative and cheap… Its a comment block… seriously…

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  • It’s true, just checked the source code, and indeed, this is the first thing you see…great find.

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  • Who thinks of this stuff. That is amazing! lol. Very cool.

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  • Viral ideas don't expand just because you blast something to a million people. The majority of people do not spread the word, the select few do. This will work because the people who do happen upon the code are going to, with great enthusiasm, tell people what they found. This will make the message much stronger than your standard advert. Don't be so quick to dismiss the creative team as cheap or lazy.

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  • I wonder what made you to view the source 😀

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  • How I miss the days of Digg being cool and putting out clever ads. ;(

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  • Thank you for posting this.  It is sometimes a struggle to stay up with my posting.  Coming across a site that puts nfl jerseys china >
    off such a unique personality is very inspirational.

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